Masako Masukata (Sculptor)

Biography

English | Japanese

Masako Masukata was born in Toyama Prefecture and raised in a communion of art and nature from an early age. Her study of glass molding techniques at Tama Art University in Tokyo helped her to develop her signature style of combining plaster with glass: by embedding the glass into the plaster, she creates minimalist works that draw attention to the sheen, shape, and texture of each medium.

Following solo and group exhibitions in 2006, Masako took a five-year hiatus before beginning to create again. Nature, sky, and city—among her favorite motifs—make frequent appearances in this new work, but rather than attempt to map the circumstances of her daily life, these pieces confront an altogether different landscape and atmosphere by reaching out into the mayhem of the world. These days, when simply being alive can feel claustrophobic, “truth” has begun to lose its meaning. Nevertheless, Masako continues to seek out truth and question what it means. These questions are what gives her work its shape.

In addition to glass, Masako employs ink, India ink, and wire to give her work shadow and establish her particular world view. Consistently, her work offers us an incomplete and abstract vision of the inner landscape of her mind, of the transience of life and nature, and of the uncertainties of modern society itself, while also serving as a multifaceted glimpse of how things look once liberated from our familiar system of values.