Karin Hirokawa (Photographer)

Biography

English | Japanese

Karin Hirokawa (born Kanagawa, Japan, 1988) is a Tokyo-based photographer.

From a young age, expressing things living in harmony was not unusual; her artist mother was her first influence. Later, as a young student, she found herself in the age of the instant camera. However, the idea of so easily ‘stopping’ the present and fixing it in time as if it were the past, or rather the mass production of instant memories, did not appeal to her. Still, compared with that period, she finds the situation today even worse. Since those early days she has become interested in the type of photography that reveals structure, science, and a variety of interpretations. Through her newly-found “third eye”, she tries to ‘see’ the world as it is today always looking for the light and the shadows. And through this she has begun to recognize the singularity of her native Japanese culture, especially where it concerns space and sense of distance. She takes her photos focusing on all of these aspects.

 

This time my theme is “space”. At the dawn of architectural history, our ancestors built simple shelters to protect them from the elements. Since then people have developed various types of shelter.

On the continents, peninsulas, and islands, each and every place has seen the birth of different tastes, styles and measures of space. It is not only that structures are built according to the space, but also that the space too is created taking into account the structure. Today we can move from city to city more easily than ever before. One of the reasons is thanks to modern architectural design, which was born after the flourishing of specific styles, describing a traditional design, in each country. This new global standard gives priority to more effectiveness and more convenience as an economical factor. On the other hand, it causes a lack of personality as well as flatness in urban areas.

Occasionally, I come across an interesting and novel architectural form by chance, but it impresses not because of some historically and profoundly imposing stature, and not because of some stylish and modern design, but because I simply find it to be sharp and unique, something that seems to resist ‘fitting in’ too easily to a mass context.

As much as possible I would like to always remain a foreigner wherever I am or go, even in my hometown of Tokyo. I don’t adapt easily to the daily present state. That is why I would like to discover something new each day. Through seeing things from the outside, I can find something original and unique in each area. And I’m still exploring agreeable and comfortable spaces as I walk around the world each day.